Tag Archive | "corn growth"

Orgone Accumulator Field Experiments with Corn Seeds


Abstract

In this study the results of six years (between 2000 and 2005) of field experiments with corn seeds charged in a four-ply Reich orgone accumulator, at different charging times, are reported. All the experiments were
performed in the same area, located in NW Italy. Treated and control groups were sown, cultivated, fertilized, and irrigated by using the same procedures and technologies. Germination rate and yield were determined each year for each control and treated group.

A statistically significant increase of the germination rate of the treated seeds was observed in the years 2000-2002, and 2004; while in 2005 a decrease was obtained. As far the yield is concerned, reliable data were collected for statistical analysis only in the years 2002-2005. A statistically significant difference (increase) of the yield was observed only in 2002.

The obtained results show an overall enhancing effect of the seeds charging in the orgone accumulator on germination rate and yield.

Introduction

Life energy would exist since the beginning of times. In the twenties, Reich found out the presence of this energy in the human body1. Free circulation of this energy inside the body is fundamental for a healthy organism. Reich called orgone this dynamic energy. Stasis of this energy could result in sickness, diseases, etc. Later on in the forties, investigating other fields of the natural sciences such as biological and physical, he saw orgone energy was present everywhere: human cells, animals, plants, rocks, air, clouds, storms, hurricanes, etc.

He conceived tools to objectively demonstrate the presence of the orgone energy. Some of these devices were also used for curative purposes. Orgone accumulator (ORAC), blanket, and DOR-buster are some of them. ORAC and blanket can be used for increasing the energy level of the organism, thus curing diseases due to a low level or a remarkable lack of orgone energy; or to concentrate this energy for other purposes. Amongst these one can find the increase of the orgonotic charge of seeds and plants in order to improve colour, smell, quality and robustness, as well as to increase germination rate and yield.

The first experiment on ORAC-charged seeds dates back to the ‘50s where a research team of a small organization in Kenmore (Buffalo, NY), Tech Products, put some corn seeds in a small three-ply orgone accumulator and compared the germination rate to that of an untreated group considered as control. They obtained 100% germination rate for the treated seeds group against 80% for the control group2.

Ritter and Ritter3 in the mid of the ‘50s performed an experiment with radish seeds. They kept some seeds in an orgone accumulator for 6 months. Then, the treated seeds were sown and an untreated group was considered as control. No difference between the two groups was found.

In recent times, more accurate controlled tests were performed with different seeds, charged for different time inside an ORAC, or plants irradiated with concentrated orgone energy or watered with ORAC-charged water.

Lane4 conducted an experiment on 8 tomato seeds charged in a 3-ply ORAC. The charging time was 28 days. She obtained an increase in the average yield per plant of +64.5%.

Dexter et al5 performed experiments with California Prunus Ilicifolia. They charged 20 seeds in an ORAC for 21 days and kept 40 seeds as control. Then, treated and untreated seeds were divided in different groups and watered with orgone–charged water or untreated water. They observed the charging of the seeds in the ORAC had a negative effect on the germination rate (-42.9%).

DeMeo6 performed experiments on sprouting of mung beans inside 1-ply and 10-ply ORACs. He obtained an increase in the average length of the treated seedlings of +91.9% and +171.6%, and in the germination rate of +5.5% and +10.2%, respectively.

Espanca in the eighties carried out a series of experiments with tomato, paprika, and aubergine seeds, and garlic bulbs charged in different accumulators. She also performed experiments to test the influence of ORAC-charged water on the growth and yield of tomato seeds and paprika plants.

Espanca obtained very interesting results from her experiments. In one of them7,8 she charged 20 tomato seeds in a 3-ply ORAC for 15 days. The total yield recorded an increase of the orgone-treated group of +492% when compared to the control group. Considering the production per plant she found an increase of +407.1%. In a following experiment9 she charged 17 tomato seeds for 20 days in a 5-ply ORAC. Also in this case she obtained very good results with an increase of the total yield for the orgone-treated group of +171.3%, while the increase in the production per plant was +87.8%

Experiments were also planned to test the influence of the type of ORAC and charging time10. 12 garlic bulbs were left in a 3-ply ORAC for 4 days and in a 5-ply ORAC for 12 days. She obtained an increase of the total yield of +30% and +36.7%, respectively. Experiments were also performed on 20 round aubergine seeds, charged in the 5-ply ORAC for 21 days and 10 seeds kept inside a 6-ply ORAC for 16 days11. An increase of the total yield of +61% and +16.6%, respectively, was obtained. Instead, when considering the yield per plant the increase was of +72.5% and +16.6%.

In 1984, Espanca charged 8 Montana Ping Pong tomato seeds in a 6-ply ORAC for 18 days12. She obtained an increase in the total harvest for the treated group of +393.8% when compared to the control group. However, when considering the yield per plant the increase was +111.6%. This is because the control group had 3 producing plants only against 7 of the treated group.

Later on, paprika seeds were kept in a 5-ply ORAC for 12 and 3 days13. A variation of the total yield of –23.8% and +60.6%, and of the yield per plant of +1.7% and +43.0%, respectively, was obtained.

In 1987 Sellers14 performed a series of tests using different methods of seeds charging and plants orgone irradiation. He charged 30 Northrup King’s tomato seeds in a 5-ply ORAC for 15 days. Then, after planting, he absorbed from, or irradiated the plants with concentrated orgone energy by a combination of different methods, including DOR-buster and ORAC-charged water. Considering the 5-ply ORAC seeds charging results only, without any combination of other methodologies, he obtained a decrease in the yield per plant of –2.0% when compared to the control one. The largest decrease in mean yield, and mean number and weight of fruits was found in the plants treated with the DOR-buster. The device was pointed at the plants for 30 minutes per day for 43 days. A reduction in the mean yield per plants of -54.9%, and a decrease in the mean number of fruits and a mean weight of fruits of -39.0% and -26.0% were found, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that the DOR-buster was drawing off orgone energy from the plants.

In the same period, Claymond15 reported on five years of experiments using potato tubers to determine the effects of ORAC charging on plant growth and yield. The results he obtained were in most of the cases negative. In 1981, 5 potato tubers were charged for 7 days in a 3-ply ORAC, obtaining a decrease of the total tuber yield for the treated group of –4.5%. Next year Claymond charged 15 potato tubers for 7 days in a 4-ply ORAC. He found a reduction in tuber yield for the treated group of –2.2%. In 1983, two groups of 15 tubers each one were charged in a 5-ply ORAC for 1 hour and 10 hours per day for 10 days. An increase in the total yield for the treated groups of +51.4% and +23.5% was found, respectively. In 1984 different charging times and ORAC sizes were considered for. No difference between charging times and ORAC sizes was found. A reduction of the overall average total yield of –9.8% was found. In 1985 potato tubers were put in a 12-ply ORAC for an average of 3.5 hours per day for 6 days. It was found a decrease in the total tubers production of –7.7%.

Claymond reported also on a longer maintenance of green living tissue in the vine of the treated potatoes (1981). The same phenomenon was also observed during the experiment performed in 1983 in spite of the occurrence of drought stress. In addition, a fullness of the canopy of the treated plants was also found (1983). Recently DeMeo16 carried out experiments on sprouting mung beans inside two multiple-ply ORAC (one inside the other), with a total accumulator strength of 13-ply and 25-ply. The ORACs were placed inside a large wooden Mini-Barn converted into a large 1-ply orgone accumulator of 3.5 x 5.0 meters size. The mung beans were kept inside the ORACs for a period of 10 days. He obtained an increase in the average seedling lengths of +34% when compared to the control ones. Also an increase in the germination rate of +1.6% was found. Other interesting results DeMeo observed were the increase of the treated seedlings weight of +8.6%, and of the average water consumed of +7.6%.

From the above overview, it can be noted that very few information has been published in the past years regarding corn seeds charged inside ORACs. Mann2 was the only author to mention on an experiment on corn seeds that were charged in an ORAC. The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of orgone energy on germination rate, plant growth and yield on a large scale when the orgonotic potential of corn seeds is artificially increased by exposing them for a specific period of time to charging inside an ORAC. Results related to six years of experiments are reported and discussed in the paper.

Materials and Methods

Test location and weather data

All the tests were performed in the same site, on an area of about 7 hectares. The area is part of a farm where corn is the main crop. The farm is located in the north-western side of Italy, in a plain at the foot of Canavese
hills and Aosta valley.

Weather data during the charging period of the corn seeds inside the ORAC, and treated and untreated plants growing-up period were supplied by the AgroMeteo Service of the Regione Piemonte (Italy). The data were
collected by a weather station located about 3.5 km SW of the test location.

The physical parameters supplied during the seeds charging phase were as follows:

  • atmospheric pressure at 2 pm, in mbar
  • minimum and maximum daily temperature, in °C
  • minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, in %
  • precipitation, in mm
  • weather daily condition

The physical parameters considered during the treated and untreated plants growing-up period were as follows:

  • minimum and maximum daily temperature, in °C
  • minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, in %
  • precipitation, in mm

The orgone accumulator

The ORAC used in all the 2000-2005 experiments, was a cubic box made of four alternating plies each consisting of a layer of fiberglass and steel wool (0 and 000 grade). The core of the ORAC was a cube made of a galvanised steel sheet (4/10 mm thick) with 50 cm on a side, while the external face was made of a masonboard squares with 94.8 cm on a side.

Figures 1 and 2 show a section and an assembled view, respectively, of the orgone accumulator.

Figure 1 – Section View of the ORAC used in the experiments

Figure 2 – Assembled View of the ORAC used in all the experiments

Seeds charging and test planning

After ORAC assembling, the corn seeds, in their original sacks, were put and left inside the accumulator for different charging times according to the test planning. The corn seeds used in all the tests is of Zea Mays
type, a single cross hybrid of first generation (F1, FAO 600 class, 130 days), commercialised by Pioneer. The seeds had a theoretical germination rate of about 93%.

Figures 3 and 4 show the ORAC assembling, and the seeds sacks loading inside the ORAC, respectively.

Figure 3 – ORAC assembling

Figure 4 – Seeds sacks loading inside the ORAC

Seeds charging times were chosen in such a way to test a large range of charging period. The ORAC during the seeds charging phase was kept outdoor, under a porch. After the seeds charging was completed, the ORAC was dismantled and put in a barn. During the seeds charging period, control seeds were left in their original paper sacks and put in a barn, far from the ORAC location, until to the sowing. Corn seeds charging times in the 2000-2005 years are reported in table 1.

Table 1 – Corn seeds charging times inside ORAC

The aim of the annual test was to determine the germination rate and yield of the treated and untreated groups. An evaluation of the plants strength and robustness was also performed. Until 2003, the test planning was based on a Standard Design (SD) where only one plot was considered for each treated and untreated groups. From 2004 on, the test was planned according to replicated experiments following the Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). This was done in order to distinguish between random variation in the system and the real effects of the treatment on the seeds. Randomizing the treatments helps eliminate the effect of bias whether it is evident or not. It groups treatment plots together and randomizes them within replicated blocks. In 2005, an additional experiment following the Standard Design (SD) was also performed. In this latter case treated and untreated plots randomization was not done.

Figure 5 shows the layout of the RCBD and SD areas for the test performed in 2005. The 302-hr charged group followed the RCBD, with four replications, while the 809.5-hr charged group the SD.

Figure 5 – Randomized Complete Block Design and Standard Design areas in the 2005-yr test

The total area dedicated each year to the test ranged between 18,900 and 56,838 m2. Table 2 reports the total area involved in the test, as well as each area dedicated to control and treated groups.

Table 2 – Total, treated and untreated groups areas involved in the tests

Sowing was carried out either late in March or beginning in April. In both the designs distance between rows was about 75.0 cm and between seeds, belonging to the same row, was about 18.5 cm, with a seeding density (population) of about 7.21 seeds per m2. The seeds were mechanically planted in the soil at a depth of about 4.0-5.0 cm. All the treated and untreated groups were sown, cultivated, fertilized, and irrigated by using the same procedures and technologies.

Germination rate was monitored about one month after sowing. As for the SD test, the monitoring covered 10% of the total area, counting the existing plants of 1 row every 10 rows. As for the RCBD test (from 2004 on), the monitoring covered 50% of the total test area, counting the existing plants of 5 rows out of the 10 rows of each plot. The germination rate was determined by dividing the counted plants to the number of sowed seeds.

Harvesting of the SD and of the RCBD sections for each test varied over the years and was carried out in September/October according to the grade of maturity of the crop. For each group of the SD test, an area containing 30 rows (excluding the headings) was accurately measured, and the yield weighted at the weighing machine. For each group of the RCBD test (from 2004 on), the total plot area (excluding the headings) was accurately measured, and the yield weighted at the weighing machine.

Weight and moisture on a sample of about 4-5 kg for each plot or area were accurately measured before and after drying. Moisture was determined by a portable grain moisture tester (John Deere, Moline, Illinois). Yield after drying was determined based on the values obtained by the dried samples.

Strength, vigour and robustness of the treated and untreated plants were monitored and compared by taking pictures of stands of corn related to all the groups before or during the harvesting.

Statistical analysis

Statistical analysis of the germination rate data was performed by using the Pearson’s chi-square test of independence, where presence or absence of germination was tested for each group (in the SD), or each block (in the RCBD). When the sample of a nominal variable was less than 1,000 the Fisher’s exact test of independence was used.

Statistical analysis on the yield data was performed by using the Student’s t-test. Where sample sizes were unequal the Welch’s t-test was instead used.

In all instances a p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

A summary of the germination rate and yield variations (treated versus control seeds) related to all the tests is reported in table 3.

Table 3 – Summary of the results obtained in the 2000-2005 tests

Tables 4 and 5 show the results of the statistical analysis on the collected germination rate data both for the SD (table 4), and the RCBD (table 5) tests. In table 4 samples of nominal data that are not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05) are shown in red.

Table 4 – Results of the statistical analysis on the germination rate data for the SD tests

Table 5 – Results of the statistical analysis on the germination rate data for the RCBD tests

Tables 6 and 7 show the results of the statistical analysis on the collected yield data both for the SD (table 6), and the RCBD (table 7) tests. In the tables samples that are not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05) are shown in red. In 2001 and 2005 (SD) statistical analysis was not performed as the size of the collected data was too small, being represented by only one data for each group.

Table 6 – Results of the statistical analysis on yield data for the SD tests

Table 7 – Results of the statistical analysis on yield data for the RCBD tests

In 2000, the only parameter determined was the germination rate. A value of +1.94% (p-value = 0.00528) for the treated group was found. Also, difference in robustness between treated and control plants was observed.
Comparison of treated and untreated stands of corn, performed after a storm with high gusts of wind which occurred in mid October 2000, highlighted a substantial difference between the two groups. Plants of the treated group were still standing up and very few had their tops broken, and also most of the ears were still stiff and pointed upwards. In contrast, most of the tops of the plants of the untreated group were broken and most of the ears were pointed downwards.

In 2001, germination rate was found to be +0.29% (p-value = 0.53264), and +2.46% (p-value = 0.00000569) for the 358-hr and 508.5-hr charged groups, respectively, when compared to the control group. Yield (moisture at 15%) was +5.38%, and +3.08% for the 358-hr and 508.5-hr charged groups, respectively. No statistical analysis was done on the yield as the size of the collected data was too small. No substantial difference in vigor and robustness was found between treated and untreated plants.

In 2002, germination rate was found to be +1.89% (p-value = 0.00000316), for the treated group. Yield (moisture at 15%) was +16.15% (p-value=0.013588), for the treated group. Difference in plant vigor and robustness between plants of the treated and untreated groups was particularly evident after a violent storm occurred in the evening of September 9, 2002, characterized by heavy rains and a strong wind (Figure 6). The storm broke many plants, especially those of the control group. The majority of the plants of the control group had broken tips and many broke below the ear. Only a few plants of the treated group were broken.

Figure 6 – Stands of treated (left) and untreated (right) corn in the 2002-yr test

In 2003, practically no difference in the germination rate between the two groups was found (+0.04%, p-value = 0.906). Yield of the treated group (moisture at 15%) was –12.18% (p-value = 0.143074) when compared to the control group. The 2003-yr test was characterized by anomalous weather conditions with very low precipitations, high temperatures and low humidity. Difference in vigor and robustness between treated and untreated plants was also observed (Figure 7). The difference was particularly clear after a storm occurred in the evening of August 18, 2003, characterized by heavy rains and an exceptional wind. The storm broke many plants of the control group. The majority of the plants of the control group had broken tips or even broke below the ear. Only few plants of the treated group were broken. However, notwithstanding this difference, a higher yield was obtained from the weaker plants of the untreated group.

Figure 7 – Stands of treated (left) and untreated (right) corn in the 2003-yr test

In 2004, germination rate was found to be +1.31% (p-value = 0.005092) for the treated group. Yield (moisture at 15%) was +2.79% (p-value = 0.174631) when compared to the control group. No substantial difference in vigor and robustness between treated and untreated plants was observed.

In 2005, germination rate was found –2.25% (p-value = 4.37∙10-38) and +0.09% (p-value = 0.78305) for the 302-hr (RCBD), and 809.5-hr (SD) treated groups, respectively. Yield (moisture at 15%) was +2.93% (p-value = 0.25698), and –1.28% for the 302-hr and 809.5-hr groups, respectively. No statistical analysis was done on the yield of the SD test as the size of the collected data was too small. In this year no particular difference between plants of the treated and untreated groups was observed. However, it should be outlined that no hailstorms or strong winds hit the area of the test. So, plants were subjected to natural growing-up and development being not subjected to heavy weather influences that could have evidenced a potential difference between the three groups of plants.

Figure 8 reports the behaviour of the percentage variation of the germination rate of the treated groups when compared to the control ones versus the charging time for the 2000-2005 years. Black squares in the graph show statistically significant values, while red squares represent not statistically significant values. All the data shown on the graph are also interpolated by a parabolic curve with the form of y=b·x+c·x2. This was done in order to see whether maximum values of the germination rate and of the yield (see Figure 9) could be found within a theoretical common window of charging times. A maximum value of the interpolating curve (dy/dx=0) of +0.86%, corresponding to a charging time of 462.5 hours (19.3 days), was obtained for the germination rate.

Figure 8 – Germination rate percentage variation for 2000-2005 data set (as reported in table 3)

Figure 9 shows the data related to the percentage variation of the yield (at moisture of 15%) of the treated groups versus charging time. Black squares in the graph show statistically significant values; red squares represent not statistically significant values; and yellow squares show values whose statistical analysis was not performed because of the small size of the samples. Interpolating parabolic curve of all the data gives a maximum value of +4.9% with a corresponding charging time of 497.5 hours (20.7 days).

Figure 9 – Yield percentage variation for 2000-2005 data set (as reported in table 3)

From the interpolating curves in the above figures 8 and 9, it can be observed that the maximum value of the germination rate, and of the yield falls in the range of charging times between 462.5 and 497.5 hours.

Discussion

Experiments with a Reich orgone accumulator have been largely performed over the last decades either with seeds, seedlings or plants charged inside orgone accumulators for well defined periods of time. However, results of tests with ORAC-charged corn seeds are totally missing in the literature. In addition, to my best knowledge, no information has been reported about a possible interaction between the charged seeds and weather conditions during the growing-up phase of the treated plants.

The weather data collected in the years of testing showed relatively homogeneous weather parameters and conditions characterized by similar physical parameters, such as pressure, temperature, humidity; and precipitation. However, the tests performed in 2002 and 2003 were characterized by quite different and opposite weather conditions. Figure 10 shows the precipitation amount for the March-October period for the six years of test.

Figure 10 – Precipitation in the March-August period in the 2000-2005 years

From the above graph it can be seen that the amount of precipitation in 2003 was the lowest recorded in the six years of test with only 494.6 mm. This is in marked contrast with what observed in the other years where
a higher amount of precipitation (spread all over the plants growing-up period) was recorded. In addition, much lower temperatures, and higher humidities both in the air and in the soil were found in the other years. 2001 had the second lowest amount of rain with 607.6 mm, that is 18.6% more than in the 2003. As we observed in the previous section, the very high temperatures and low precipitation in 2003 affected the outcomes leading to a premature harvesting of the crop, with a very low value of the yield of the treated group (-12.18%, p-value = 0.143074) when compared to the control one. In 2002, we had the highest amount of rain (1,177.4 mm) together with the highest average yield on record (+16.15%, p-value = 0.013588). In 2002 the trend of the temperatures and humidities were close to normal. So, it can be assumed that the amount of water available to the treated seeds, and later (treated) plants during the growing-up period might be of some importance in the overall development of the (treated) plants, and then on the total yield. The drought-tendency weather in 2003 could have adversely affected the growing-up, and then the yield of the plants of the treated group, perhaps acting in some way on the orgone energy charge of the treated plants (seeds), thus resulting in a negative response of the plants in term of yield when compared to the control ones. The opposite was instead true in 2002 when the water available to the treated plants was much higher than usual. It is worth of noting that in 2002 both the germination rate and the yield variations were statistically significant thus evidencing the quality and the efficacy of the orgone treatment on the seeds. So, the higher amount of precipitation spread all over the growing-up period helped and supported the action of the higher orgonotic charge of the treated seeds that was not instead observed in 2003. It is then reasonable to assume that the treated seeds, being the orgonotic charge higher, might require more water in the growing-up phase than the untreated seeds. If this does not occur the efficacy of the treatment might be very low or even negative, as observed in the test of 2003. A requirement that was also observed by DeMeo (2002) when 15 carrying out experiments on sprouting mung beans inside ORACs. He noted that the seedlings inside the ORAC consumed more water (+7.6%) than those kept outside, considered as control. He obtained an average increase of the length, and of the weight of the treated seedlings of 34%, and of 8.6%, respectively. It would be interesting to know what might have occurred to the mung bean seedlings inside the accumulator if they were forced to consume less water, or at least the same amount of the control ones.

Finally, the plants of the treated groups showed most of the time a higher vigor and robustness when compared to the untreated ones, especially when exposed to harsh weather conditions, such as heavy rains and strong winds. This occurred particularly in 2000, 2002, and 2003. This result could be associated again to the action of the higher orgonotic charge of the treated seeds. This point is supported by the fact that in 2002 both the germination rate and yield variation were statistically significant. Thus, the higher strength and robustness of the treated plants might be the consequence of the orgone treatment which the seeds were subjected to as well. A higher plants development and lesser senescence were also observed by Claymond (1987) on potatoes plants, and by Espanca (1981-1986) on tomatoes plants as a response to the orgone treatments.

Conclusions

The results reported in this study do bear out the working hypothesis of the effectiveness of the orgone energy on the biological activity of the treated corn seeds. A statically significant variation for the germination rate was observed in 5 out of 8 tests; and for the yield in 1 out of 4 tests.

A higher strength and robustness of the treated plants was visually observed in 3 out of 6 years of experiments, mainly after the plants were subjected to harsh environmental conditions such as high winds and heavy rain.

The negative result achieved in the yield of 2003, that could be considered the consequence of the drought-tendency weather; and the positive one in the yield of 2002, that seems to be the consequence of above normal precipitation, requires further studies to evaluate the potential effects of the artificially-increased orgonotic level of the treated seeds versus environmental conditions during the whole growing-up phase.

As a whole, the effect and interaction of key factors such as seeds charging times, weather physical parameters, weather conditions, and presence of Oranur and DOR conditions in the atmosphere (not considered in this study), that could play a major role in affecting and regulating the charge of the corn seeds and the growth of the seedlings/plants, still remains to be clearly and fully understood.

References

  1. Reich W, The Discovery of the Orgone. Vol. I, The Function of the Orgasm, Farrar Straus & Giroux, New York (USA),
    1973; and Reich W, Ether, God and Devil, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 1973.
  2. Mann WE, Orgone, Reich and Eros, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1973; also in Vital Energy and Health, Houslow Press, Toronto, 1989.
  3. Ritter P, Ritter J, Experiment Orgone Flower Pot, No 1, Orgonomic Functionalism, Vol. 1, No 6, Ritter Press, Nottingham, November 1954.
  4. Lane L, Effects of the ORAC on Growing Plants, Journal of Orgonomy, Vol. 11, No 2, Orgonomic Publications Inc, New York, May 1977.
  5. Dexter ME, Desmond LJ, Coen KS, Orgone Energy and Plant Growth, Energy and Character. The Journal of Bioenergetic Research, Vol. 8, No 3, Abbotsbury Publications, September 1977.
  6. DeMeo J, Seed-Sprouting Inside the Orgone Accumulator, Journal of Orgonomy, Vol. 12, No 2, Orgonomic Publications Inc, New York, November 1978.
  7. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 3, Autumn 1981.
  8. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 2, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 4, Spring 1982.
  9. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 3, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 6, Spring 1983.
  10. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 4, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 7, Autumn 1983.
  11. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 5, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 8, Spring 1984.
  12. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 6, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 11, Autumn 1985.
  13. Espanca J, The Effect of Orgone on Plant Life, Part 8, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 13, Autumn 1986.
  14. Sellers PA (pseudonym, Sellers CG), The Effect of Orgonotic Devices on Tomato Plant Growth, Offshoots of Orgonomy, no 15, Winter 1987.
  15. Claymond HJ (pseudonym, Heckman J), Effect on the Orgone Accumulator on Potato and Onion Plants, Annals of the Institute for Orgonomic Science, Vol. 4, September 1987.
  16. DeMeo J, Orgone Accumulator Stimulation of Sprouting Mung beans, Pulse of the Planet, no 5, Natural Energy Works, Oregon (USA), 2002.

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